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A human fingerprint is a marker of our identity, just as a tree’s rings are a record of its particular life. The ring shape is recurring in my work, speaking to themes of existence and individuality. While my art investigates and celebrates the individual, it also juxtaposes concepts of unity and togetherness.

 

These latter ideas surface through my fabrication methods. Many small elements are amassed, each one unique and interesting on its own. Yet, when arranged together something larger and stronger is formed, each singular piece contributing to support the whole. 

 

My artmaking process emulates the meaning behind the work; I engage a community of individuals in the creation of each public art installation. Whether I am inviting the public to hands-on workshops or collaborating with a team of professionals, many people experience the evolution of each project, linking each participant to something bigger than themselves.

 

Just as every individual and every community evolves, so do I and my art practice. The world in which we live is becoming seemingly more divided, so using my artwork to advocate for unity is increasingly a priority. Relatedly, our planet’s dire state is inspiring me to experiment with recycled and left-over materials, especially sawdust, beyond my typical repurposing of fallen trees. As I’m increasingly designing pieces with more permanency, I’ve begun working with steel and epoxy in addition to wood, and am excited to continue my investigation into the durability of different materials.